Motivation vs. Dedication


I won’t lie to you… there are plenty of days when I really just don’t feel like working out. Some days I would love to just sit on the couch all day, especially during our current “stay-at-home” status but I know that, if I do that, I won’t reach my goals and I won’t show my daughter what life can look like with fitness in it. This is what keeps me coming back to the gym again and again. It’s what forces me to get my workout in on those harder than usual days.

When you look at me or at the posts I make or when you talk to me, most people say that I am always motivated but that isn’t really the truth. I can easily portray that by not posting about the times when my motivation is low. I don’t do this to deceive people but when my motivation is out, it’s out for everything and I don’t go on social media. For the most part, I rely heavily on my dedication to my goals and my dedication to showing my daughter a healthy life.

I really take the time to plan out what goals I want to achieve. This year I have been focusing on getting stronger and more technical on the barbell and improving my gymnastics abilities. To do that, I have a certain amount of time each week that I spend working on each. Having an end goal is key to using dedication when motivation is lacking. This gives me a reason to go to the gym when I simply don’t want to.

Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays are for strength work. I cycle through different programs. I began the year with an Olympic weightlifting cycle. I did two different cycles. The first was an 8-week basics program; I focused on broad lifting technique. After I finished I took about 2 weeks off before going into a more in-depth 12 week program. This was where my strength got to show. By the end of the cycle I PR’d my back squat, front squat, and push press. I have since moved on to focusing on my technique on both the snatch and clean. I keep the weight super low and focus on tweaking little things here and there that I notice need work. I have also added in some accessory work to help maintain/build some more muscle.

Tuesday, Thursdays, and Saturdays I focus on my gymnastics. I have a goal of getting a ring muscle up which requires quite a bit of upper body strength. I started out the year with 1 strict pull-up (barely) and have progressed to 6 strict and unbroken pull-ups. I have been spending only 15-20 minutes a day, 3 times a week working on my gymnastics and it is paying off.

Those are my dedications. They are what get me started when my motivations don’t want to. On the days that I am severely lacking, I tell myself that I just have to get through todays cycled work. I don’t worry about getting in a WOD or going for a run; I simply settle for just getting these 20 ish minutes in. Most days that is enough to make me get to the rest of my workouts. Once I get out there and start moving everything falls into place. I start to feel myself and I start to want to do more. Don’t get me wrong, there are days when that doesn’t work and I only end up doing my 20 minutes of accessory work but I still did 20 minutes, I still chipped away a little bit at my goals, I am still moving in the right direction.

So, what does this mean for you? How can you make this work for you? What is the major takeaway that you can implement in your life? I would tell you to set some goals. Make those goals S.M.A.R.T.; Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Timely.

A Specific goal should answer a simple question; what do you want to do? Use specific action words to describe what it is you want to do. Lastly, make your goal direct, detailed, and meaningful to you. Who cares what other people want; this is a goal specific to you.

Making a goal Measurable means there is a way to track your progress. There must be a way to evaluate where you are moving. This is as simple as answering the question, “How will I know when I’ve reached my goal?”

An Achievable goal means that this is a goal that you are capable of accomplishing. This is where you get to check yourself; make sure that your goals aren’t too crazy and aren’t too unattainable. You still need to make sure this goal challenges you and will keep you pushing throughout your journey. Answer this question, “Is it in your power to accomplish this goal?”

Making your goals Relevant answers the question, “Can I realistically achieve this?” Does this goal make sense for you? This is a time for you to be honest with yourself about what you are capable of.

A Timely goal sets a deadline to achieve your goal. This one is important. When you have a deadline, you are more likely to push yourself a bit harder. So, answer this question, “When exactly do I want to accomplish this?”

This is the key to making goals that you will actually stick with; that you can actually achieve. Take your goals a step further and work with a coach who will help you tackle those goals. Nitz Clear Focus Training offers goal sessions where we talk about what your goals are and break down how you will get to those goals. We push S.M.A.R.T. goals a little bit farther by helping you make a detailed plan and helping you realize your goals.

What are you going to do to make yourself become dedicated to your fitness?

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